Not All Soles Are Equal

What Sole Should You Choose

There are several different types of soles all with their own features and benefits, in this post we will look at the soles available with the BSC and why you should choose them. Please note that although generally each style of shoe only comes on a particular sole, once the sole is worn down you can change the sole type when its repaired (dropping them into your local City Cobbler store is a great idea).

Lets start with the Granddad of soles;

Leather

Leather soles are the most traditional soling material with an unmistakable aura of quality. leather is durable, flexible, Breathable, with an ability to mould and shape to your foot. This makes for a comfortable shoe that fits like a glove over time. You usually find leather soles on more elegant or formal styles as it has a very refined silhouette. Sometimes noted with leather is that it can be a tad slippery in the wet. If you are particularly worried about slipping then maybe you should try;

Dainite

Dainite has been around almost as long as the greatest shoemakers, Dainite is a brand of sole made exclusively by the Harboro Rubber Co in England.  These soles have a very distinctive tread pattern that is easily recognised, which unlike some other sole's, stops mud and stones getting stuck to the sole. It is hard wearing, Comfortable, comes in variety of thickness to fit dressy or country shoe's and with more grip than leather makes it an excellent all rounder. One thing that has been noted with Dainite soles is it doesn't offer quite enough grip when walking on muddy terrain, if you need this then you could try;

Commando

Commando soles are a very popular boot sole option thanks to their rugged profile, thick lugs and weather resistance. It’s not uncommon to see commando soles in everything from work to hiking boots. One defining characteristic of a commando sole is their large protruding lugs that provide great grip and traction. Along with adding plenty of visual weight to a boot’s profile, commando soles are also quite heavy and will result in a clunkier boot style. if your after something a bit lighter you should try;

Ridgeway

Ridgeway soles are another hard wearing rubber sole option that is used in a variety of boot styles. They can be characterised by their thick protruding lugs and large ridge channels that offer great traction and stability. Ridgeway soles are more lightweight than commando soles but are thicker than Dainite boot soles and will have a more raised profile. They can act as a good in-between option for those who need a hard wearing boot sole. Of course if your after an all together more summery feel try;

Crepe

Crepe soles are made of rubber and have a distinct "squiggly" pattern on the sole. Crepe rubber soles have a rich and long history as the soles on British combat boots during WWII. They do not provide the best traction and should be avoided for wet weather or winter wear. But their common yellow/sponge characteristics can provide a great look in casual boots like the popular Sanders Hi-Top and Barker Desert Boots.


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